How to Crop a Graphic in QuarkXPress


Steps:
1.Select the Content or Item tool.
2.Point to and click on the photograph or graphic you want to crop.
3.Point to one of the handles outlining the photo or graphic nearest the area you want to crop.
4.Hold down the mouse button (left button Windows) and drag the handle inwards toward the photo or graphic.
5.Stop dragging and release the mouse button when you have cropped out the unwanted part. 
Tips:
You can also use the Content tool to drag the photo itself out of sight within the picture box, instead of dragging the photo box handles.
Cropping in QuarkXPress removes from view only the part of the graphic you didn't want to include. If you decide you want to include the area you cropped, simply reverse the procedure, dragging outward away from the photo or graphic.   

How to Treat Dehydration in the Wilderness


Steps:
1.Prevent dehydration by drinking lots of water - more water than you think you need, and enough to make your urine clear.
2.Administer cool water in copious amounts if you suspect mild dehydration. Drink until urine is clear.
3.Administer diluted electrolyte replacement drinks or oral rehydration solution in addition to copious amounts of water if you suspect moderate dehydration. The dehydrated person should drink at least 1/4 liter of electrolyte replacement drink an hour, with as much water as possible.
4.Avoid caffeine, soft drinks and alcohol.
5.Avoid antihistamines and decongestants.
6.Evacuate immediately to a hospital if you suspect severe dehydration, monitoring vitals and treating for shock throughout the evacuation process. The severely dehydrated person is in a life-threatening situation and will require intravenous therapy in a hospital. 
Tips: Oral rehydration packages can be purchased in most outdoor recreation stores. You can also improvise your own solution in the field by mixing 1 tsp. salt and 8 tsp. sugar to 1 liter of water. 
Warnings: This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. 

How to Make Turkey Fritters

Ingredients:
Steps:
1.Mix flour, baking powder, salt, dried thyme, black pepper, red pepper, allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg in a mixing bowl.
2.Add beer and lemon juice, and stir until just blended.
3.Add 1 c. minced leftover turkey.
4.Heat 3 inches of vegetable oil in a deep, heavy pot over medium-high heat until it is 365 degrees F.
5.Spoon 1/4 c. batter into the oil for each fritter. Make about three at a time so that the pot isn't crowded.
6.Fry fritters for 3 minutes or until lightly browned, and turn over. Cook 1 more minute.
7.Drain the fritters on paper towels.
8.Serve warm with hot red pepper sauce and wedges of lime. 
Tips:
A frying thermometer is almost essential for deep-frying.
You can strain the oil afterwards and use it again (for frying only) if it hasn't gotten too dark.    

How to Avoid Giving Personal Information to Web Sites


Steps:
1.Avoid giving your Social Security number to anyone online for any reason unless you are certain that the site is trustworthy and the browser connection is secure.
2.When shopping online, make sure the site is secure before providing your name and address.
3.Be selective when registering with Web sites. Read the company’s privacy policy before providing personal information. Look for a little box somewhere in the registration form that grants your permission for the company to send you mail or, worse, sell your personal information. This box is often prechecked. Uncheck it if you do not wish to receive mail from the site.
4.If you don’t see any privacy information in the registration process, look for a statement somewhere on the site that describes the company’s policy. If you don’t find one, send e-mail to the site’s Webmaster. Ask that your information not be used.
5.If you get e-mail from a site where you registered or shopped, and you didn’t request it, look for a way to “unsubscribe” described at the bottom of the e-mail message. If you don’t find one, try writing back to the e-mail address and asking to be taken off the mailing list.
6.When posting to a Web-based discussion board, use only your first name or use a fake name. Avoid providing any contact information other than your e-mail address and the URL of your Web page.
7.Try setting your browser to reject cookies, but realize that many site features won’t work without cookies. (Cookies are what makes it possible, for example, for a site to know that you’ve been there before.)   

How to Avoid a Lawsuit if You Have to Fight


Steps:
1.Don’t provoke a fight. Inherent in the legal concept of self-defense is a knowledge of who is at fault, or who started the fight.
2.State loudly, "I don’t want to fight you" to an attacker. If overheard by witnesses, it adds support to your case should the attacker become injured and try to sue.
3.Seek to escape as soon as possible when attacked. The longer the fight goes on, the greater the chances for injury and litigation.
4.Don’t wait until you are physically struck to use the force necessary to prevent being physically harmed. If an attacker raises his fist or a knife, prepare to strike fast and hard. You’re still the victim who is acting reasonably against bodily harm.
5.Practice degrees of self-defense. Know the difference between an annoying relative and a serial killer and how to deal with each. Discriminate between escape and control techniques (side steps, throws, joint locks) and contact techniques (strikes, gouging, breaks). Keep your technique proportional to the circumstance.
6.Research the laws in your area. Call the Public Defender’s office, check the Law library or scan the Internet to find out the legal basics of self-defense. When is self-defense necessary, proportional, reasonable? When is deadly force acceptable? When is it okay to use a weapon? 
Tips:
When you have to use force, only use that force necessary and deemed reasonable to protect yourself, another person or your property.
Laws vary widely across countries. In America, some states allow the prosecution to offer evidence of the defendent’s past, such as a history of violence inflicted on a spouse. 
Warnings:
These guidelines are not a complete nor a consistent representation of self-defense law in all situations. Seek professional legal advice to learn more about local statutes and laws.
Using excessive force, disproportionate to the circumstances, may lead to a lawsuit. You could be charged with a crime that ranges from simple assault to murder. 

How to Create Reading Games for Students With Dyslexia


Steps:
1.Research dyslexia. Find out what symptoms and deficits a student with dyslexia has. Assess the child's knowledge of the alphabet. Practice making letter sounds. Combine letters and letter combinations to create words. Teach the rules of the English language. Review frequently.
2.Look through reading instructional catalogues. Some games are very expensive but can be reproduced easily. Other games need to be modified to meet the needs of your students. Look through catalogues or go to an educational store. Have your notebook handy and write down ideas and the materials that you will need to create or modify the better games that you find.
3.Modify popular board games to meet the needs of your students. Find a game your students love and change the rules, using game pieces or cards to teach whatever reading skill you are trying to reinforce in the class.
4.Brainstorm with other teachers. You and your colleagues learned a great deal of information during your own schooling. Tap into that knowledge by holding think-tank parties during planning periods or in your class after school.
5.Encourage your school's administration to allow for time to collaborate as educators during staff meetings.
6.Tap into your students' creativity. Tell your students you are trying to think of a game idea but you are just stuck and cannot come up with anything. You will be surprised how many students will jump at the opportunity to create an incredible game and solve a problem for their teacher. 
Tips:
Be creative. If one game doesn't work, change it so that students find it interesting.
Vary instruction methods to keep reading interest alive at home and in the classroom.
Buy trade and self-help books for ideas on instructing and parenting techniques.
Create a game section in your school's library. Have teacher's create games for the game section so that all teachers can check out games and add to or revise them. 
Warnings: Use competitive games only when competition is appropriate. Adapt some games to encourage participation rather than competition.   Steps:
1.Research reading disabilities. Learn about the symptoms and deficits of students with reading disabilities.
2.Create games that assess the child's knowledge of the alphabet. Encourage the child to make letter sounds and to combine letters to create words.
3.Make games that teach the rules of the English language, and use the games to review the rules frequently.
4.Look through catalogs that offer reading games and other instructional materials. Some games are very expensive but can be reproduced easily. Some popular games can be modified to meet the needs of your students.
5.Go to a store that sells educational materials. Have your notebook handy and write down ways to create or modify great games that you find there.
6.Modify popular board games to meet the needs of your students. Find a game your students love and change the rules, games pieces or cards to teach the reading skills that you are trying to reinforce in the classroom.
7.Brainstorm with other teachers. Hold "think tank" parties during planning periods or in your classroom after school.
8.Encourage your school's administration to allow teachers to collaborate during staff meetings.
9.Tap into your students' creativity. You will be surprised how many students will jump at the opportunity to create an incredible game for classroom use.  
Tips:
Be creative. If one game doesn't work, change it so that students find it more interesting.
Vary instruction methods to keep the interest in reading alive at home and in the classroom.
Buy trade and self-help books for ideas on instructional and parenting techniques.
Create a game section in your school's library. Have teachers create games that other teachers can check out, add to or revise. 
Warnings: Use competitive games only when competition is appropriate. Adapt some games to encourage cooperation rather than competition.    Steps:
1.Talk to your child about the learning disability. Discuss openly exactly where he or she is having trouble and what steps you will take together to overcome it. Involve your child in the special education process as much as possible.
2.Involve yourself in his education. Go to meetings and school events. Follow your student's academic progress, and actively participate in setting up your student's individual education plan. Consult with your child and his or her teacher about class work and projects.
3.Learn what modifications help your student academically. Try things such as calculators, computers or word processors, books on tape and tutors. Ask your child's teacher for ideas to try at home and offer your child's teacher your ideas as well.
4.Follow a schedule. Following morning and evening routine will create clear expectations for your child whether getting ready for school or bed. Establish routines for getting ready for school as well as for chores and homework.
5.Teach your child how to organize. Designate special book bags for different activities, and appoint a special place in the house to keep them. Color coordinate subjects and supplies such as folders, pens and note cards. Create checklists for homework or daily chores.
6.Allow your child to make decisions. Teach him or her how to analyze a problem by posing choices, using everything from food and snacks to daily or family activities.
7.Create reward systems at home for chores, behavior or school progress. Keep track of a target area that needs improvement. Decide on target areas as a family and rewards and/or consequences to reinforce the behavior. 
Tips:
Join parent clubs that your child can interact in as well.
Sponsor or coach a club or an organization that your child can be a part of.
Participate in school functions and field trips.
Discuss social situations you see or watch on TV.
Teach your child good grooming and discuss hygiene.
Praise your child often. 
Warnings: Find information on how to effectively parent your child with special needs if you experience extreme frustration dealing with your student.   Steps:
1.Assess the child's knowledge of the alphabet. If a student does not know the names of all the letters of the alphabet, one cannot assume the child will know the sounds the letters make.
2.Practice making letter sounds. Start with the simple individual sounds each letter makes and, upon mastery, gradually move to more complex consonant and vowel combinations. Use a lot of variety in sound instruction; it can become boring very fast. Play games using letter magnets, flash cards or letter blocks. Look for and cut out letters and letter combinations from the newspaper.
3.Combine letters and letter combinations to create words. Start with simple sight words and, upon mastery, gradually increase the difficulty of the words. Apply the same decoding strategies you used with sounding out letters to prompt the child in sounding out new words. Say things like, "What sound does 'c' make? What sound does 'a' make? What sound does 't' make? Now put the three sounds together." Again, vary the instructional techniques you use to increase learning and motivation.
4.Teach the rules of the English language. After the child has mastered simple letter combinations, begin teaching combinations that sound alike but are spelled different, like 'ea' and 'ee'. Teach suffixes and prefixes and the rules that apply to them. Gradually add skills as the child masters each lesson.
5.Review frequently. Even if a child has mastered a language skill, repetition is essential if the child is to retain the information and be able to apply it in the classroom and in everyday life.
6.Read books that have mastery words in them. Obtain a recommended reading list online or through your child's school. Inquire at your library which books would be appropriate for your child's level. And read, read, read! Practice every day. 
Tips:
Vary instruction methods to keep reading interest alive at home and in the classroom.
Buy trade and self-help books for ideas on instructional and parenting techniques.
Create list and lists of words that have similar sounds, letter combinations, suffixes and prefixes. Refer to them whenever the child is stuck on a word. 
Warnings: Know when to give your child a break. Spending every minute practicing will frustrate and upset your child.   

How to Reduce Your Child's Television Viewing Time


Steps:
1.Get a TV listings guide or magazine, and plan TV viewing in advance. Use a highlighter to mark the shows your kids will watch, and stick to the planned schedule to eliminate channel-flipping.
2.Set time limits. Choose the number of hours per week that you are willing to let your children watch television, and stick to the limit you have set. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children should not watch more than one to two hours of television per day, and that children under two should not watch TV at all.
3.Turn the TV off during family meals to encourage conversation and interaction.
4.Set a good example. Limit your own viewing time, and plan what you will watch in advance. Spend time reading or exercising with your children whenever possible.
5.Invite your children’s suggestions about TV watching, but retain veto power. Offering them a range of viewing choices, rather than just deciding for them, will help them to become more discerning viewers.
6.Offer a wide range of other activities that your kids may enjoy. Encourage them to get up, get out and get moving as much as possible, and to read books rather than watch TV.
7.Avoid using the TV as background noise - play music instead.
8.Make sure your children don’t do their homework in front of the TV. Make it clear to them that schoolwork should be completed in an atmosphere that helps them to focus on the work they are doing.
9.Explain to your children why it is important not to watch too much TV. Talk about the importance of physical fitness and fresh air, and discuss the value of books and imagination. 
Tips:
Be flexible on special occasions – if there is a specific educational event or historical milestone on TV, let your children watch it without counting it as part of their weekly limit.
If your children tend to be channel-flippers, hide the remote control for a while to help get them out of the habit. 
Warnings:
Avoid installing a TV in your child’s bedroom. Instead, watch TV together as a family, which allows you to monitor the quantity and quality of the shows your child is watching.
Don’t offer extra TV as a reward for good behavior. Stick to the family limits and offer other, more appropriate rewards if you like. Using the television as a reward or taking it away as a punishment will make it seem much more important to your child.   

How to Make a "Thank You" Book as a Holiday Gift


Steps:
1.Write down all the things you are thankful for. If the book is for your parents, you might include things such as "Thank you for teaching me how to drive" or "Thank you for going to all my soccer games."
2.Come up with as many as you can; you’ll need at least 25 to make the book a decent size.
3.Enter them all into a word-processing program. Hit Return after every four or five words so that each reason takes up three to four lines of text.
4.Insert a page break after each reason so that you end up with one per page. Center the text both horizontally and vertically.
5.Select an attractive, easy-to-read font, and then increase the font size to somewhere between 18 and 24 points.
6.Create a title page that simply says, "Thank You," in 36-point type.
7.Print it all out on your printer using the best print quality.
8.Draw crop marks lightly on the title page showing where you want the pages cut; a good rule is the crop marks should be 2 inches from the text.
9.Take your printouts to a copy center (such as Kinko’s), and have them print out all your reasons on high-quality résumé paper. Ask them to copy the title page and a blank back page onto heavy cardstock to create a cover. Then have all of it tape bound and cropped according to your marks. 
Tips:
Give yourself several days to compile your list. Many more will occur to you after you first make your initial list. Remember that no reason is too small or silly.
If you have terrific handwriting, you can write out the reasons in calligraphy, and then have them copied to give the book a more personal touch. It’s better to use copies because the ink on your originals might smear.
You can use ribbon to bind your book instead of having it tape bound, but this will make the book more fragile.   Steps:
1.Write down all the reasons you love that person. If, for example, the book is for your husband, you might include things like "You know just where to scratch my back," "You kill spiders for me" or "You’re such a great father."
2.Come up with as many as you can; you’ll need at least 25 to make the book a decent size.
3.Enter them all into a word-processing program. Hit Return after every four or five words so that you end up with three to four lines of text.
4.Insert a page break after each reason so that you end up with one per page. Center the text both horizontally and vertically.
5.Select an attractive, easy-to-read font, and then increase the font size to somewhere between 18 and 24 points.
6.Create a title page that simply says, "Why I Love You," in 36-point type.
7.Print it all out on your printer using the best print quality.
8.Draw crop marks lightly on the title page showing where you want the pages cut. A good rule is the crop marks should be 2 inches from the text.
9.Take your printouts to a copy center (such as Kinko’s) and have them print out all your reasons on high-quality résumé paper. Ask them to copy the title page and a blank back page onto heavy cardstock to create a cover, and then have all of it tape bound and cropped according to your marks. 
Tips:
Give yourself several days to compile your list because more ideas will occur to you after you make your initial list. Remember that no reason is too small or silly.
If you have splendid handwriting, you can write out the reasons in calligraphy and then have them copied to give the book a more personal touch. It’s better to use copies because the ink on your originals might smear.
You can use ribbon to bind your book instead of having it tape bound, but this will make the book more fragile.   

How to Pack for a Trip to London


Steps:
1.Prepare for cool, damp weather year-round.
2.Pack business attire appropriate to your line of work. Suits are a business staple for men. For women, hose are a must with suits.
3.Think casual for taking in the sights and sounds of the city. Jeans, khakis, T-shirts and sweaters are common attire.
4.Bring a blazer and slacks (men) for dining out or taking in a show. Women will impress in a dress or skirted outfit.
5.Pack an all-weather winter coat, long underwear, turtlenecks, boots, socks, gloves, scarf and a hat if you plan to be there between November and March. Wear rubber-soled shoes to avoid slipping on any ice.
6.Opt for lightweight wool, heavier cotton and fleece clothes for easy layering during the summer months. Pair summer attire with walking shoes to sightsee comfortably.
7.Take two pairs of shoes. If one pair gets wet, you won't be obligated to trudge around with soggy feet.
8.Pack an umbrella and a raincoat no matter what time of year you go.
9.Bring an appropriate power adapter to recharge batteries for computers, phones and small appliances. 
Tips:
Bring a carry-on bag that includes all necessities you might need in case your luggage goes astray: passport, a change of clothes, all medications, spare contact lenses or glasses, all forms of money and any important documents.
Pack to accommodate your needs. Leave superfluous items at home.   

How to Prepare Your Home for a Heat Wave


Steps:
1.Put up outdoor awnings or louvers. This can help reduce the heat entering the house by as much as 80 percent.
2.Hang shades or drapes to block out direct sunlight from rooms.
3.Identify other places where you can go to stay cool, such as the library, the mall or movie theaters - if you do not have air conditioning in your home.
4.Plan outdoor activities for the early morning or later in the evenings, when temperatures are at their coolest.
5.Take a training course on how to recognize and treat heat stroke and other heat-related emergencies.
6.Stock up on bottled water, since you need to drink more during extreme heat. Men are more susceptible to heat-related illness than women because they become dehydrated more quickly.
7.Cool your home with window air conditioners or ceiling fans.
8.Insulate your home properly to conserve electricity and help the air conditioning to act efficiently.
9.Install weather stripping on outside doors and windows to prevent the cool air from escaping.
1..Use storm windows year-round to keep the heat out.
1..Use an attic fan to take warm air out of the attic and cool down the house. 
Tips:
During a heat wave, avoid the sun.
Wear loose, light-colored clothing.
Check on elderly relatives and neighbors.
Eat light foods. Heavier foods are harder to digest and cause you lose water more quickly, increasing your risk of becoming dehydrated.  
Warnings: Heat stroke can be fatal. Seek medical treatment if your breathing becomes shallow and you feel light-headed and overheated.   Steps:
1.Understand that each hurricane is different, and be prepared for the worst.
2.Make a list of outdoor items, such as lawn furniture or yard tools, to bring inside during a hurricane watch.
3.Keep trees and shrubbery trimmed.
4.Make sure your gutters and drains are clear to prevent flooding during the long bouts of heavy rain that often accompany hurricanes.
5.Use permanent hurricane shutters on windows and doors. This is much safer and more effective than taping the glass, which does not prevent breakage. Protect the outside of windows with shutters or plywood.
6.Develop an evacuation plan. Contact your local emergency management office or local chapter of the American Red Cross for information about the safest evacuation routes and locations of nearby shelters.
7.Have blankets or sleeping bags available in case you need to go to a shelter.
8.Determine in advance what you will do with any pets.
9.Stock up on disaster supplies such as flashlights and extra batteries, a battery-operated radio, a first aid kit, emergency food and water and a handheld can opener.
1..Invest in flood insurance for your home because home owner's policies do not cover the damage caused by hurricane-related floods. 
Tips:
During a hurricane watch, turn the refrigerator and freezer to the coldest settings. If the power goes out, the air inside will stay cool longer.
Store drinking water in clean bathtubs, jugs, bottles and cooking utensils.
If you plan to leave your home, move furniture to a higher floor to prevent flood damage, if time permits.
If you live in a place where hurricanes occur, consider elevating your home, or ask an engineer to advise you on how to make your home more resistant to hurricane damage.
Have a plan in place for all family members to check in with a relative or friend who lives out of the state and can serve as messenger.